Suicide Prevention

Are you thinking about suicide and need immediate help?

If you are thinking about suicide and feel that your life may be in immediate danger, or have already taken steps to end your life, we would advise you to call the emergency services immediately.

Remember, if a life is in danger it is an emergency.

Don’t be scared: it is the right thing to do. You must get help and you will not be in trouble.

How do I get emergency help?

Call 999 from any phone. Try to be as clear as you can about where you are, your name and description and any details of injuries you may have or steps you might have taken.

Also be as open as you can about your thoughts of suicide.

Even if you haven’t already taken steps to end your life it’s still OK to ring 999. 

If you are immediately at risk and don’t feel able to keep safe from suicide this is still an emergency.

Another option could be to make your own way to your local A&E department. If you are unsure where this is you can search online or ring NHS 111 for advice.

Many people worry that they will be wasting people’s time if they go to hospital or that A&E is only for physical injuries.

We want to reassure you that this isn’t the case and that most A&E departments will have mental health professionals working alongside them who can support you.

The people there can then assess you to see what support you might need moving forward and they can help to keep you safe in the meantime.

If you don’t feel able to or confident doing either of these then we advise reaching out to someone you trust who can help you access this help.

Are you worried that someone else may be about to kill themselves?

If it is safe to do so, tell the person that you would like to get them medical help now.

Stay with them, and, depending on what you feel able to do, either:

  • call their GP surgery, or
  • call 999, or
  • take them to A&E and if possible stay with them until they are seen by a member of the mental health team.

Are you having suicidal thoughts and would like help and support?

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, help and support is available from the following organisations:

Samaritans

Who can use the service – Anyone of any age

Help available – Someone to listen to you and who can offer help and support

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

How can help be accessed - telephone, e-mail, post or in person

Full details - See the Samaritans website for full details.

CALM

Who can use the service – Men in the UK of any age

Help available – Information and support for those who are down or in crisis

When can it be accessed – 5pm until midnight, 365 days per year

How can help be accessed – Helpline or webchat

Full details – See the CALM website for full details

Papyrus/HOPELineUK

Who can use the service –    People under the age of 35 who are having thoughts of suicide. People worried about someone under 35 who may be having thoughts of suicide.

Help available – Support and advice

When can it be accessed – 10am to 10pm weekdays,

                                             2pm to 10pm weekends

            2pm to 5pm Bank Holidays

            365 days a year

How can help be accessed –  Helpline, text or e-mail

Full details – See the Papyrus/HOPELineUK website for full details

The Trevor Project

Who can use the service –  LGBTQ people aged 13 to 24 

Help available –  Support and advice

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (Lifeline)

How can help be accessed – Helpline (instant message/text service available at limited times)

Full details – See the Trevor Project website for full details

Childline

Who can use the service –  People under the age of 19

Help available – Support and advice

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

How can help be accessed – Telephone or online

Full details – See the Childline website for full details

NHS Choices

Who can use the service – Anyone

Help available – Information and advice

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

How can help be accessed – Telephone

Full details – See the NHS Choices website for full details

Are you worried that someone you know may be having suicidal thoughts?

See the Samaritans website for advice about things to look out for which might be a sign that things are going wrong and how you can help.

The CALM website also has advice you may find useful.

Page last updated: 16/11/2017