Suicide Prevention

Are you thinking about suicide and need immediate help?

If you are thinking about suicide and feel that your life may be in immediate danger, or have already taken steps to end your life, we would advise you to call the emergency services immediately.

Remember, if a life is in danger it is an emergency.

Don’t be scared: it is the right thing to do. You must get help and you will not be in trouble.

How do I get emergency help?

Call 999 from any phone. Try to be as clear as you can about where you are, your name and description and any details of injuries you may have or steps you might have taken.

Also be as open as you can about your thoughts of suicide.

Even if you haven’t already taken steps to end your life it’s still OK to ring 999. 

If you are immediately at risk and don’t feel able to keep safe from suicide this is still an emergency.

Another option could be to make your own way to your local A&E department. If you are unsure where this is you can search online or ring NHS 111 for advice.

Many people worry that they will be wasting people’s time if they go to hospital or that A&E is only for physical injuries.

We want to reassure you that this isn’t the case and that most A&E departments will have mental health professionals working alongside them who can support you.

The people there can then assess you to see what support you might need moving forward and they can help to keep you safe in the meantime.

If you don’t feel able to or confident doing either of these then we advise reaching out to someone you trust who can help you access this help.

Are you worried that someone else may be about to kill themselves?

If it is safe to do so, tell the person that you would like to get them medical help now.

Stay with them, and, depending on what you feel able to do, either:

  • call their GP surgery, or
  • call 999, or
  • call 111 option 2, or
  • take them to A&E and if possible stay with them until they are seen by a member of the mental health team

Are you having suicidal thoughts and would like help and support?

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, help and support is available from the following organisations:

Essex Partnership University Trust (EPUT) contact centre

Crisis Response Service

The Crisis Response Service operates 24 hours a day, and offers immediate and specialist support to adults experiencing mental health crisis.

Anyone in need can dial 111 at any time and select the option for mental health crisis (option 2). Callers will be connected to trained EPUT staff who can provide timely and appropriate support and advice. This service is for people in Essex aged 18 and over and aims to ensure those in need of support can access it quickly when they need it most.

Adults

If you, a family member or friend are in crisis and need help, please dial NHS 111 and select the option for mental health crisis. You will be connected to our contact centre where trained staff will provide appropriate support and advice 24 hours a day.  You do not need to be known to EPUT.

Under 18s

If you are under the age of 18 or are the family member of someone under the age of 18 who is in crisis, please call North East London NHS Foundation Trust’s Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Service on 0300 300 1600 or email.

If you need urgent help or out of hours help, call 0300 555 1201.

Serious or life-threatening emergencies

The crisis service does not replace 999. If you or someone you know is in serious or life-threatening mental health crisis and requires emergency mental or physical care, dial 999 immediately.

NB: Service does not replace 999 for life threatening mental health crisis

Samaritans

Who can use the service – Anyone of any age

Help available – Someone to listen to you and who can offer help and support

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

How can help be accessed - telephone, e-mail, post or in person

Full details - See the Samaritans website for full details.

Details of Southend Samaritans can be found on their website.

CALM

Who can use the service – Men in the UK of any age

Help available – Information and support for those who are down or in crisis

When can it be accessed – 5pm until midnight, 365 days per year

How can help be accessed – Helpline or webchat

Full details – See the CALM website for full details

Papyrus/HOPELineUK

Who can use the service –    People under the age of 35 who are having thoughts of suicide. People worried about someone under 35 who may be having thoughts of suicide.

Help available – Support and advice

When can it be accessed:

  • 10am to 10pm weekdays
  • 2pm to 10pm weekends
  • 2pm to 5pm Bank Holidays
  • 365 days a year

How can help be accessed –  Helpline, text or e-mail

Full details – See the Papyrus/HOPELineUK website for full details

The Trevor Project

Who can use the service –  LGBTQ people aged 13 to 24 

Help available –  Support and advice

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (Lifeline)

How can help be accessed – Helpline (instant message/text service available at limited times)

Full details – See the Trevor Project website for full details

Childline

Who can use the service –  People under the age of 19

Help available – Support and advice

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

How can help be accessed – Telephone or online

Full details – See the Childline website for full details

NHS Choices

Who can use the service – Anyone

Help available – Information and advice

When can it be accessed – 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

How can help be accessed – Telephone

Full details – See the NHS Choices website for full details

Stay Alive App

This app is a pocket suicide prevention resource, packed full of useful information to help you stay safe. You can use it if you are having thoughts of suicide or if you are concerned about someone else who may be considering suicide. 

In addition to the resources, the app includes a safety plan, customisable reasons for a living, and a life box where you can store photos that are important to you. See the Prevent Suicide website for more detials.

Other useful websites

Support After Suicide Partnership (practical and emotional support for people bereaved and affected by suicide)

Mental Health Foundation

Mind (National)

South East and Central Essex Mind

Are you worried that someone you know may be having suicidal thoughts?

See the Samaritans website for advice about things to look out for which might be a sign that things are going wrong and how you can help.

The CALM website also has advice you may find useful.

For further information about mental health services in Southend please see our mental health services page.

"Suicide Let’s Talk" Zero Suicide Alliance e-learning programme

The Zero Suicide Alliance provides free suicide prevention e-learning training which is accessible to all. The aims of this training are to: enable people to identify when someone is presenting with suicidal thoughts/behaviour, to be able to speak out in a supportive manner, and to empower them to signpost the individual to the correct services or support, see the Zero Suicide Alliance website.

 

NHS 111

Telephone: 111 Option 2

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